Garth Brooks – The Country Legend’s Discography from 1989 to 2007


Garth Brooks - The Country Legend's Discography from 1989 to 2007

Garth Brooks is one of the most successful and influential country music artists of all time. He has sold over 170 million records worldwide and has won numerous awards, including 2 Grammys, 17 American Music Awards, and 12 Academy of Country Music Awards. He is also the only artist in history to have nine albums certified diamond by the RIAA.

Brooks’ discography spans from his self-titled debut album in 1989 to his compilation album The Ultimate Hits in 2007. In between, he released 10 studio albums, 3 live albums, and several singles and EPs. His music covers a wide range of styles, from traditional country to rock, pop, and even rap. He is known for his powerful vocals, catchy melodies, and emotional lyrics that touch on themes such as love, faith, family, and patriotism.

In this article, we will take a look at Brooks’ discography from 1989 to 2007 in FLAC format, which is a lossless audio codec that preserves the original quality of the recordings. We will also provide some information about each album, such as its release date, track list, genre, and chart performance.

Garth Brooks (1989)

This is Brooks’ debut album, released on April 12, 1989 by Capitol Records. It was produced by Allen Reynolds and featured 10 tracks written or co-written by Brooks. The album introduced Brooks’ signature sound of blending country and rock elements, and showcased his vocal range and storytelling skills. The album spawned four hit singles: “Much Too Young (To Feel This Damn Old)”, “If Tomorrow Never Comes”, “Not Countin’ You”, and “The Dance”. The latter became one of Brooks’ most iconic songs and won him several awards. The album peaked at number 2 on the Billboard Top Country Albums chart and number 13 on the Billboard 200 chart. It was certified diamond by the RIAA in 2006.

No Fences (1990)


Garth Brooks (1989)

This is Brooks’ second studio album, released on August 27, 1990 by Capitol Records. It was produced by Allen Reynolds and featured 10 tracks written or co-written by Brooks. The album was a huge commercial success, selling over 17 million copies in the US alone. It also received critical acclaim for its diverse musical styles and themes. The album spawned five hit singles: “Friends in Low Places”, “Unanswered Prayers”, “Two of a Kind, Workin’ on a Full House”, “The Thunder Rolls”, and “Wild Horses”. The first two became Brooks’ signature songs and reached number one on the Billboard Hot Country Songs chart. The album topped both the Billboard Top Country Albums chart and the Billboard 200 chart for several weeks. It was certified diamond by the RIAA in 1991.

Ropin’ the Wind (1991)


No Fences (1990)

This is Brooks’ third studio album, released on September 2, 1991 by Capitol Records. It was produced by Allen Reynolds and featured 10 tracks written or co-written by Brooks. The album was another blockbuster success, selling over 14 million copies in the US alone. It also received positive reviews for its musical experimentation and maturity. The album spawned four hit singles: “Shameless”, “What She’s Doing Now”, “The River”, and “Papa Loved Mama”. The first three reached number one on the Billboard Hot Country Songs chart. The album became the first country album to debut at number one on the Billboard 200 chart and stayed there for 18 weeks. It also topped the Billboard Top Country Albums chart for 33 weeks. It was certified diamond by the RIAA in 1998.

The Chase (1992)


Ropin' the Wind (1991)

This is Brooks’ fourth studio album, released on September 22, 1992 by Liberty Records. It was produced by Allen Reynolds and featured 10 tracks written or co-written by Brooks. The album was a departure from Brooks’ previous albums, as it explored more serious and controversial topics such as racism, domestic violence, AIDS, and war. The album spawned four hit singles: “Somewhere Other Than the Night”, “Learning to Live Again”, “That Summer”, and “We Shall Be Free”. The last one was a gospel-inspired anthem that

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